Risks by commune ..............

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Risks by commune ..............

Postby peter » Sun Feb 11, 2007 11:25 am

Since the 2002 floods, communes are required to record information about natural risks on this register : http://www.prim.net . This website lists national information as well as local information.

Looking at Pezenas, as an example of info by commune, risks are listed as Feu de forêt, Inondation, Mouvement de terrain, Rupture de barrage, Séisme, Transport de marchandises dangereuses

This information must be communicated to buyers and renters of property in the commune.

http://www.prim.net by commune alsosections on Information acquéreur / locataire, Information préventive, Atlas de Zone Inondable,
Prise en compte dans l'aménagement, Arrêtés de reconnaissance de catastrophe naturelle.

The government has declared 9 national catastrophies affecting Pezenas since 1980 - mostly being flooding and mud damage.

You can overlay various risques onto departmental maps. e.g. Herault : Image

There is a national flood register here : http://www.vigicrues.ecologie.gouv.fr . It is updated with river depths every 15 minutes.

Surprisingly, Languedoc Roussillion is an earthquake zone with the associated risk of Tsunami.

The earthquake centre is : http://www.emsc-csem.org/#2

A Tsunami centre will be opened in July : http://www.midilibre.fr/2011/04/28/le-senateur-roland-courteau-annonce-l-ouverture-du-centre-national-d-alerte-aux-tsunamis-pour-juillet,310825.php

There have been serious earthquakes in Languedoc Roussillon as recently as 1428 :

The Catalan earthquake of 2 February 1428, known in Catalan as the terratrèmol de la candelera because it took place during the Candlemas, struck the region of Catalonia, especially Roussillon, with an epicentre near Camprodon. The quake was one of a series of related seismic events that shook Catalonia in a single year. Beginning on 23 February 1427, tremors were felt in March, April, 15 May at Olot,[2] June, and December. They caused relatively minor visible damage to property, notably to the monastery of Amer; but they probably caused severe weakening of building infrastructure. This would account for the massive and widespread destruction that accompanied the subsequent 1428 quake.
Modern estimates of the intensity are eight (damaging) or nine (destructive) on the Medvedev-Sponheuer-Karnik scale.[3] The ramparts of Prats-de-Mollo-la-Preste were destroyed. The clocktower of Arles-sur-Tech collapsed. The monastery of Fontclara at Banyuls-dels-Aspres was devastated. The damage sustained by the monastery of Saint-Martin-du-Canigou marked the commencement of its decline. The belltower and cimborio of Sant Joan de les Abadesses fell down. The chapel at Núria was destroyed. The villages of Tortellà and Queralbs were entirely destroyed. Among the damaged structures were Santa Maria de Ripoll and Sant Llorenç prop Bagà. As far away as Perpignan and Barcelona the populace was gripped by panic. In the latter, the intensity was estimated at six (strong) or seven (very strong). The rose window of the Gothic church of Santa Maria del Mar was destroyed.
Robin de Molhet, lord of Peyrepertuse, who was travelling in his domains when the earthquake struck, quickly came to the aid of victims, which earned the recognition of Alfonso V of Aragon, who was away in Valencia at the time of the tremors. He was informed by the President of the Generalitat de Catalunya, Felip de Malla, in a letter.[4] It is estimated that hundreds of people were killed in the disaster: two hundred are estimated at Camprodon, one to three hundred at Puigcerdà (due to the collapse of the church), twenty to thirty at Barcelona (in Santa Maria del Mar), and almost the entire population of Queralbs. The fallout lasted well over a year. The quake was probably the worst in the history of the Pyrenees,[citation needed] though the first recorded only occurred in 1373. It remains to this day a point of reference for the study of seismic risk.


Updated May 2011
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Postby 66to11 » Mon Apr 14, 2008 12:11 am

Found one for Aude with list of communes and flood risk maps for each.
http://www.aude.pref.gouv.fr/protection ... ereurs.asp
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Postby St Florentin » Mon Apr 14, 2008 7:57 am

When we sold the old place in January, the Notaire was required to make mention of the fact that St Florent sur Rekkers was in an area 'sous risque d'inondation' which made me laugh.

In 2002 when places like Sommières disappeared under 2m of water the river here (a small stream actually) did rise by about 3m but no-one was flooded. That being so, the place we were selling was half way up the flank of the hillside (so is the new house) and if these properties were ever to be at risk of flooding you lot on the littoral better watch out!

According to the carte IGN the properties are at over 270m above mean sea level, and the river bed is at least 50m below that. Now I don't doubt that some of the properties built on the flood plain might be at risk, but methinks someone with a big felt pen has decided on the 'risk' area without looking at the spot heights!

I suppose when global warming really gets a decent hold of the ice caps we might be at greater risk, but I think for the moment I can sleep safely in the knowledge that flooding is for the moment not a problem!
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Postby peter » Mon Apr 14, 2008 8:38 am

Hi

just worth saying why Sommieres flooded :

1)Speculative building of the medieval town in AD1100 (during the drought years of the the middle ages) substantially narrowed the path of the river.

2)Subsequent building of roads and buildings has reduced the available flood plain.

3)The source valley of the river Vidourle near Anduze had 650mm of rain over 48hrs. This is more than the annual rainfall for London. This became a wall of water as it flooded the valley and headed for the narrows at Sommieres. Sommieres itself had under 150mm of rainfall.

I think the moral of the story, is that it is very difficult to predict the extent of flooding if very high rainfall falls upstream.

And, a warning, -

Recently, a sign has been erected to the effect that an area of former vineyards (opposite the Sommieres Intermarche) is going to be developed to provide 300 building plots. This land is not shown as being floodable on the official flood maps. In 2002, I witnessed it being under about 50 cm of water the morning after the flood. Improved drainage has been installed, but also a new shopping centre nearby has reduced the area for water absorption. This land is slightly higher, but quite close to where this pic was taken :

Image


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Postby St Florentin » Mon Apr 14, 2008 3:31 pm

Peter, it's not that difficult to predict the risk of flooding if you live on a flood plain. That's the problem with a large proportion of properties both here and in the UK. Flat building land is cheap to construct on, but as you so rightly say if you try to prevent the river from going where it used to, then eventually it will bite back.

There is no doubt that the events of 2002 were outside the norm, but it does seem that these '50 year' floods are happening more frequently.

I remember all to well the sight of the hundreds of wrecked cars both at Boucoiran and in Alès, and I feel sorry for the people who suffered losses as a result.

These events should serve as a reminder to anyone who lives less than 5m above normal river levels that one day they might wake up to wet feet. I guess that's probably why in earlier times people lived on the first floor and the animals on the ground.

Let us not forget that in Roman times Nîmes was much closer to the sea than it is today, and the water used to lap against the walls of Aigues Mortes in the 13th century. It won't take much to put a considerable amount of the mediterranean coastline back under water.

Best regards from (eventually) St Florent sur Mer.
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Postby peter » Fri Jul 24, 2009 8:47 am

Following the floods of 2002, a national database of risks has been set up.

www.laregion-risquesnaturels.fr

Key in the commune name here to discover the potential risks in any commune. If risks exist, a sub menu will direct you to additional information.

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Postby peter » Sun Nov 06, 2011 11:35 am

Posting to avoid pruning
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Re: Risks by commune ..............

Postby peter » Wed Jun 19, 2013 10:48 am

Useful website listing mosquito risks by department and town.

There are three dangerous species in France :

1-Aedes (inc Tiger mosquito) : Viral diseases, such as yellow fever, dengue fever and Chikungunya, transmitted mostly by Aedes aegypti. Dengue fever is spread through the bites of infected mosquitoes and cannot be spread person to person.
Severe dengue can be fatal, but with good treatment, less than 1% of patients die from dengue.

2-Anopheles : About 460 species are recognized; while over 100 can transmit human malaria, only 30–40 commonly transmit parasites of the genus Plasmodium, which cause malaria in humans in endemic areas. Anopheles gambiae is one of the best known, because of its predominant role in the transmission of the most dangerous malaria parasite species (to humans) – Plasmodium falciparum.

3-Culex : Culex is a genus of mosquitoes where several species serve as vectors of important diseases, such as West Nile virus, filariasis, Japanese encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis and avian malaria.


http://vigilance-moustiques.com
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Re: Risks by commune ..............

Postby serge » Wed Jun 19, 2013 11:36 am

Thanks Peter,

Coming over in a few weeks, do you think these would be OK or should one go for the full rubber NBC suit?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Disposable-Brea ... mical+suit
"The trouble with quotes on the internet is that you never know if they are genuine" - William Shakespeare
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Re: Risks by commune ..............

Postby peter » Wed Jun 19, 2013 11:45 am

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Re: Risks by commune ..............

Postby peter » Sun Jun 23, 2013 8:37 am

Live allergy map and info :

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http://www.pollens.fr
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